A Feminist a Day: Victoria Wood

Who is she?

pp-victoria-wood-5-gettyeaVictoria Wood was a British comedian and actress, singer-songwriter and director, who sadly died this week of cancer aged 62.

Victoria was one of Britain’s most loved comedians throughout her long career, which included a 15-show run at the Royal Albert Hall, the TV series Dinnerladies and her 1980s sketch TV show As Seen On TV.

She wrote comedy that women could relate to and her characters were often women who had not-so-glamorous jobs. The British public adored her and her career has opened up the doors for many female comedians who followed her.

Why should we thank her?

Victoria opened the doors for many female comedic performers in the UK and her influence can be seen in the work of actresses such as Jane Horrocks, Caroline Quentin and and Kathy Burke.

Best quote

(On breasts): “If God had meant them to be lifted and separated, he would have put one on each shoulder.”

A Feminist a Day: Victoria Wood

A Feminist a Day: Dame Leonie Kramer

Who is she?

Kramer (1)Dame Leonie Kramer was the first woman to be Professor of English in Australia (at the University of Sydney) and the first woman to be Chair of the board of the ABC. She was also the first woman Chancellor of the University of Sydney.

She was a controversial figure at times – she was critical of the acclaimed Australian author Patrick White – and she chaired the Miles Franklin Award panel which chose Helen Demidenko’s book The Hand That Signed the Paper as the winner.

Why should we thank her?

Dame Leonie was a formidable figure in academia in Australia and achieved an incredible amount for a woman of her time.

 

 

A Feminist a Day: Dame Leonie Kramer

A Feminist a Day: Frances Perkins

Who is she?

frances perkinsFrances Perkins was America’s first ever female Cabinet member and was Secretary of Labor in Franklin Roosevelt’s government.

Her influence helped steer some of the USA’s most important ever social changes – the “New Deal”, the creation of Social Security and establishing the minimum wage.

Frances was a social worker who became head of the New York Consumers League. She kept her name when she married (pretty rare back then) – defending her right to do so in court, no less.

While in New York, she witnessed the infamous 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, which claimed the lives of 146 young women – she would later say that was the day the New Deal began. She was on committees to investigate the fire and dedicated herself to workers’ rights.

Why should we thank her?

Frances is known as the Mother of Social Security – so, literally hundreds of millions of Americans can thank her for supporting them when they may not have been able to do so themselves.

Personally, I love the fact that she went to court to uphold the right to keep her name when she married. I’m sure she’d roll over in her grave if she knew how many women change their names when they marry today.

Best quote 

“Feminism means revolution and I am a revolutionist.”

 

A Feminist a Day: Frances Perkins

A Feminist a Day: Justin Trudeau

Who is he?

Justin-trudeau083Justin Trudeau is the Prime Minister of Canada. His dad was also the PM of Canada.

When he came to power last November, Justin memorably announced that his Cabinet would comprise 15 men and 15 women. Why? “Because it’s 2015”, was his answer.

He’s also declared himself to be a feminist, and that he wants to raise his children to be feminists, too.  On International Women’s Day, he unveiled a plan to feature a Canadian woman on the country’s banknotes. He’s also pro choice.

Why should we thank him?

Not enough men, let alone leaders of countries, stand up and declare themselves to be feminists, highlighting as he has, that it’s an opportunity to improve our society for all.

Best quote

“The days when old men get to decide what a woman does with her body are long gone. Times have changed for the better.”

A Feminist a Day: Justin Trudeau

A Feminist a Day: Dame Zaha Hadid

Who is she?

dame zaha hadidDame Zaha Hadid, who died this week, was one of the world’s most prominent and influential architects.

Best known for designing the London Olympic swimming stadium, Dame Zaha was a trailblazer for women architects in a traditionally male dominated field.

Her designs were innovative and she became reluctantly known as the “Queen of the Curve” for her distinct fluid style. Among her noted buildings are the Opera House in Guangzhou, the Peak Leisure Club in Hong Kong and the Vitra Fire Station in Germany.

Why should we thank her?

Dame Zaha was one of the world’s best architects and an accomplished businesswoman, who was often outspoken about the barriers to women in her profession.

Her buildings will live on to inspire generations of female architects and delight the world with the power and possibility of beautiful buildings.

Best quote 

“There are 360 degrees, so why stick to one?”

A Feminist a Day: Dame Zaha Hadid